Putting the Pieces Together

Putting the Pieces Together

Learn about our research into the long-term effects on children and young adults of ARV exposure and HIV infection since birth. 

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Why We're Here

Why We're Here

In our own words: read about why members of our community of researchers, Community Advisory Board members, caregivers, and clinicians are part of PHACS.

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Community Engagement

Community Engagement

Read about our Community Advisory Boards and health education initiatives.

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HIV/AIDS News

STORIFY: Digital resources for HIV testing beyond #NHTD

June 27 was the 20th observance of National HIV Testing Day (NHTD). Organizations and individuals across the HIV community use this annual observance to amplify resources that encourage HIV testing as the first step to living healthy. Topsy, a social media analytics tool you can track Twitter conversations and data, stated that the #NHTD hashtag ...

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Appreciating Dr. Jack Whitescarver’s Many Contributions to HIV/AIDS Research

At the end of this month, we bid a fond farewell to a colleague who has played a key role in leading Federal research efforts in response to HIV/AIDS since the earliest days of the epidemic. As NIH previously announced, on July 1, 2015, Dr. Jack Whitescarver is retiring and stepping down as NIH’s Associate...

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Events & Announcements

Fall 2015 Network Meeting

Fall 2015 Network Meeting

The Fall 2015 Network Meeting will be held at the DoubleTree Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland on October 29-30, 2015. We are also planning on holding separate retreats for the Study Coordinators and CAB on October 28, 2015 at the same location.

Spring 2016 Leadership Retreat

Spring 2016 Leadership Retreat

The Spring 2015 Leadership Retreat will held at the Embassy Suites Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Maryland on March 15-16, 2016.

 

 

Adult Children of AIDS Victims Take Their Memories Out of the Shadows

The Recollectors are an online community of adult children of parents lost to AIDS. The group views storytelling as a form of activism — correcting a false narrative and reclaiming their shared past. They aim to build a printed and oral history of their experiences.

Click here for the full New York Times story... »